education

4 Major Misconceptions About Music Supervision

screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-2-41-43-pm
Just a few of the panels and presentations from the Guild of Music Supervisors State of Music in Media Conference earlier this month.

The secret to getting your music placed in film and television?

Don’t piss off Music Supervisors.

I’m joking of course (CALM DOWN)….but we are a deeply close and very passionate community. If you burn one of us, be it a clearance issue or say, a published article, there is a good chance the word will spread, and quickly. It’s honestly one of the things I love most about being a Music Supervisor: we protect our own and we defend our craft.

In the past month or so there have been a couple articles that have incensed this vocal community.

TV and Film Music Supervisors Are Killing Real Songwriting (LA Weekly)

War Dogs, Suicide Squad and The Lost Art of The Movie Soundtrack (Flavorwire)

Why have these frustrated Music Supervisors so much? They are based upon a lack of education and incorrect assumptions about what the job of a Music Supervisor actually entails. Not that it’s surprising. The job title has been thrown around so much in the media lately it’s no wonder the general public has a skewed opinion. Very few people – even within the entertainment industry – have any idea what we really do.

I don’t have any incisive responses that haven’t already been covered (with style and sass) by my colleagues. Michael Perlmutter’s response on the Instinct Entertainment website is a must-read. Instead, I wanted to take the opportunity to address several of these major misconceptions about the craft of Music Supervision – some that are perpetuated in these articles, and some that I’ve found working in the field or heard regularly lamented by peers.
(more…)

Durango Songwriters Film & TV Expo 2016 / 9 Tips for Presenting Your Music to Music Supervisors

Music with a view – Ventura, CA

Another fantastic Durango Songwriters Film & TV Expo has passed, full of music (both live and recorded), delicious tacos and hanging out at the firepit into the wee hours.

As mentioned in the recap of my first trip to Ventura last year, it’s one of the few conferences most music supervisors genuinely enjoy and get excited about. After all, what’s not to like about spending the weekend (almost) literally on the beach? On the other side of the table, artists benefit from the fact that, unlike other events where music supervisors flee immediately after their panels, we are all staying in the same hotel for over two days, so there is ample opportunity to form real relationships. This arrangement however, has as much potential to go wrong as it does to go right. For more on navigating and getting the most out of this tricky networking situation check out last year’s post.

This year the idea for what type of follow up artists might find valuable came immediately. While the conference provides good guidelines for attendees, after a few conversations with other music supervisors we came up with a few more specific suggestions to add to help artists get the most out of their Durango experience – or really any conference in which you are presenting music to music supervisors.
(more…)

826LA and Tadpole Audio / Hammer Museum Workshop “From Song To Scene (And In Between)”

By Amanda DK

For the past couple years I have been involved with 826LA – the local branch of a national organization helping kids improve their writing skills. Founded by Dave Eggers, 826LA offers a variety of programs including after school tutoring, field trips, student publications, in school tutoring, and my favorite, weekend workshops. Workshops are taught by volunteers who work with the Director of Education to develop an idea or area of expertise into a full fledged two hour experience, culminating in a final, writing-related, product. One such workshop I recently taught explored the relationship between the writing, performance and music.
(more…)